Kitchen Vastushastra Explained

The USHA Kitchen

The USHA Kitchen

Lately there has been a resurgence in ancient Indian philosophy from a very scientific point of view. Take for instance the myth of Dashaavatar where the 10 incarnations of Lord Vishnu can be viewed within an evolution perspective, as Homo Sapiens moved from Matsya (the fish), Kurma (the amphibious tortoise), through Narshima (half man-half beast),  Rama (the ideal Man) and finally to Kalki (the destroyer of beings – resembling Darwin’s struggle for ‘survival of the fittest’). Similarly Vastushastra or the ancient Hindu doctrine of temple architecture is today being used more and more to plan out living spaces. A huge treatise in itself, of which we will only discuss the kitchen in this post. However, even as we take our first baby steps into the world of Kitchen Vastushastra let me warn you that things have changed – people live differently today. And with new lifestyles old ways innovate with style. So switch on to a New Life With USHA. 

USHA COOKTOPS: Vastu dictates the cooking stove to be at South-East

USHA COOKTOPS: Vastu dictates the cooking stove to be at South-East

Let’s begin with the most basic kitchen appliance, the Cooking Stove / Cooktop. Vastu dictates that it should be at the South-East and shouldn’t be too close to the wall. The former is simple space logic, having a stove at the South-East allows people to store both kitchen utensils and grocery/ingredients along the South and West for easy access. As the ancient laws also dictate that storage units for essential commodities like grains, pulses spices and other non-perishable commodities should be stocked along the South or the West direction. Regions where sunlight wasn’t really necessary – as most ancient kitchens windows were in the East, giving the previous farming communities early access to sunlight.

USHA HOODS, enable you to place your cooktop at any distance from the walls

USHA HOODS, enable you to place your cooktop at any distance from the walls

As for the latter reason of avoiding stoves too close to the walls was because during those days most homes were built with combustible materials; and people were just being cautious.However, today with the emergence of Hoods and new building materials this rule has almost become redundant in most urban homes.

USHA WATER DISPENSER: Store water towards the North East

USHA WATER DISPENSER: Store water towards the North East

The ancient Treatise also instructed people to build their kitchen sinks and store their Drinking water towards the North-East of the Kitchen, this was to ensure that the early morning rays killed the germs thereby keeping the water purified. Similarly fruits and other perishable materials were stored by the water for the very same reasons, which today could be replaced as a place for our Juicers.

USHA JUICERS: Keeping fruits by the window if not inside a Fridge makes sense

USHA JUICERS: Keeping fruits by the window if not inside a Fridge makes sense

Other Cooking Utensils were to be stored next to or near the cooking stove for convenience, in ancient times it could have meant pots and pans, as they were frequently used. For us it would mean our Ovens and Fryers, which would help us to keep a lookout on things – if we happen to be cooking more than a single dish at a time using various different appliances.

USHA FRYER: Appliances located close will help you watch-over your dishes

USHA FRYER: Appliances located close will help you watch-over your dishes

That’s some science titbits behind the glorious art of Vastu, but as we had mentioned earlier, times have changed and with our modern USHA appliances you can place anything, anywhere as you like; as long as you add logic and a little style to it.

USHA HALOGEN OVEN: Happy Cooking!

USHA HALOGEN OVEN: Happy Cooking!

Thinking of rearranging your kitchen? Go ahead and Play with USHA kitchen appliances – Jaw-dropping both in style and the delicious recipes they can cook up.

To Explore More Appliances Click Here

Living on the Edge

If you came here thinking of the screams and riffs of Aersomith’s most famous single and their Live Concert staple anthem – Livin’ on the Edge, you couldn’t be more wrong. But hold on because you are at the right place at ironic some level. Just as the legendary band put to melody issues ranging from racism to religion in the song, this too is about such social issues. It talks about communities in Bhutan who live off the map -without roads, electricity and other everyday things that we take for granted.

Tiger's Nest Monastery

Tiger’s Nest Monastery

A community neglected by media, their own suave urbanites, yet strangely not by the Bhutanese Royals, especially the Queen Mother (read/watch the session: The Travelling Eye). Remote and ‘so far from anywhere’ these communities live on the edge not just geographically (though that can be contested if one speaks of the Bhutanese terrain and settlements along or below the edges of mountains and cliffs like the famous Tiger’s Nest Monastery); and economically living off a harsh land and dangerous forest; but also culturally preserving an amalgamation of wisdom that would sound strange to a city dweller.

Marie Venø Thesbjerg, Passang Passu Tshering, Dr. Francoise Pommaret in conversation with Siok Sian Dorji, discusses these issues beautifully in this namesake session at the Usha presents Mountain Echoes Literary Festival 2014 at Thimphu Bhutan.

As an added bonus it is a pleasure to listen to Marie Venø Thesbjerg’s talk about yet another kind of ‘Living on the Edge’ – that of Buddhist Nuns; not only did she live among them but also made a documentary on them.

 

Speaking of Hanuman – The Monkey God

Lord HanumanThe Scriptures say that among all the Gods in the Hindu pantheon only Lord Hanuman is still alive in flesh and blood in the whole wide world, walking its meandering paths in His various avatars. The Monkey God is also known for acknowledging the immense devotion shown by His followers, perhaps being a devotee Himself of Lord Ram, He understands the piety of disciples a little better than most Gods. We came across a few classic examples of such dedicated reverence, at Usha presents Mountain Echoes 2014 during the ‘Speaking of Hanuman’ session with Arshia Sattar and Dasho Karma Ura in conversation with Namita Gokhale.

Arshia Sattar who is a Muslim by birth was fascinated by the Monkey God as a child (and still is), a devotion that grew into worship and passion leading her to write a Thesis on Hanuman for her PHD at an US University. Her mother reasons that during her childhood Arshia was once bitten by a monkey and hence this obsession.

During the session Sattar relates various anecdotes about her Lord – how she found a Hanuman Chalisa out of nowhere in the middle of America or the time when a huge monkey walked right into her house and sat by her completed Thesis almost meaning to say  ‘Great work, now go and submit my story!’.

As the conversation progresses we get a glimpse of the many forms of the Monkey God, how through various avatars and names the Lord appears in myriads of mythologies, religious pantheons and legends across art, culture and religion. To sit through the entire discussion is like re-discovering Hanuman again in a new light. Go ahead and pay homage to the Lord by watching the video below.