The Tradition of Fish & Chips

Fish and ChipsCod Fellas, Cod Father, Frydays, Frying Squad and Plaice to be, are names of a few Fish & Chips outlets in Great Britain. The British have a colourful tradition of giving quirky names to their Fish & Chips outlets. Almost considered to be their national dish, it can be traced back to the 1860’s. Before that though Brits did eat Fish and Chips they were never consumed together. The idea to pair them into a single dish was a brilliant one – and even found its way into classic English literature, the most famous being in a Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.

An apt course for parties, supper or a quick lunch the Fish and Chips are not as unhealthy as you think; unlike other fried dishes, an average portion of fish, chips and peas contains only 7.3% fat.

Ingredients :(Serves 4 persons)

  1. 500 gm fish fillet (boneless) – cut into 8 rectangular pieces
  2. ½ cup flour (maida)
  3. 1 tbsp lemon juice
  4. ½ tsp salt, ½ tsp pepper
  5.  ¼ tsp pepper, ¼ tsp salt

BatterUsha Fryer

  1. 2 eggs, 6 tbsp flour (maida)
  2. 1 tbsp oil
  3. 2 pinches baking powder
  4. 2 pinches salt n pepper
  5. 1 tsp lemon juice

To serve

Method

  • Wash the fish fillet and pat dry on a kitchen towel.
  • Marinate the fillet with salt, pepper and lemon juice. Keep aside for 10-15 minutes.
  • Mix all ingredients of the batter to get a thick coating batter. Rest for 10-15 minutes.
  • Spread some flour in a plate. Dredge the fish fillet in the flour thoroughly.
  • Leave it on the flour till you are ready to serve.
  • Dip the fish fillet in batter.
  • Set the Usha Deep Fryer knob at 170C and wait till the red light turn green.
  • Deep fry fish pieces for 4 minutes till cooked through and golden.

And that’s how you cook this legendary English dish. Try it as a welcome break from your Butter Chickens and Machar Jhol.

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